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Molly's Blog

Teaching Math

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Monday, November 25, 2013

Schools often struggle with how to teach mathematics in a way that engages children and prepares them for high school and college course work. One of my favorite books on the subject is A Mathematician's Lament by Paul Lockhart, subtitled How Schools Cheat Us Out of Our Most Fascinating Art Form.

Blocks in Our Classrooms

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Monday, November 25, 2013

Here at Children's Day School, our preschool students play with blocks daily. Block building provides young children with a play-based opportunity to develop physical, mathematical, scientific, linguistic and social-emotional skills. Unit blocks are an adaptable and open-ended material, which allows children at every developmental stage to achieve true mastery with them, and affords children an autonomous and active role in their learning.

Access to a First-Rate Education

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, November 14, 2013

At a recent retreat of the Board of Trustees of Children’s Day School, the facilitator, a former long-time Head of Lick-Wilmerding High School here in San Francisco, said to the trustees: “Do not be afraid of asking for money on behalf of the school. Remember that you are offering donors the opportunity to change the world.”  I was thinking about how powerful that statement was this week.

I Love to Watch You Play

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, October 24, 2013

We chose Madeline Levine’s book, Teach Your Children Well, as the all-school read this year because we love her focus on giving children the space to be kids and her counsel to cut back on the multitude of after school classes, teams and lessons that are sucking so much energy out of our students and out of family time. When students talk about weekend days that are jam packed with sports and activities but sleeping and eating are cut short, you know that priorities are skewed.

I Love to Watch You Play

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, October 24, 2013

We chose Madeline Levine’s book, Teach Your Children Well, as the all-school read this year because we love her focus on giving children the space to be kids and her counsel to cut back on the multitude of after school classes, teams and lessons that are sucking so much energy out of our students and out of family time. When students talk about weekend days that are jam packed with sports and activities but sleeping and eating are cut short, you know that priorities are skewed.

Losing is Good for You

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Friday, October 4, 2013

<p>A number of years ago, I was packing up the home my children had grown up in to move to Southern California. &nbsp;My son, who was in college at the time, had acquired a couple of boxfuls of trophies from soccer and baseball. These were the same trophies made of ticky-tacky that sports leagues across the country hand out for participation, for playing in the finals and for being a good sport. I asked him if he wanted them and he said no. I thought that odd and assumed that when he was older, perhaps he would want them. So I dutifully packed them up and moved them to La Jolla.

Playworks on the Yard

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2013

I want to share some great news about a new program we are employing on the yard during recess. Rebecca Kroll, Assistant Head of School, writes below about some new techniques we're trying this year to improve the recess experience for all.

Footballs fly, hoops circle, balls bounce, kids zoom, feet pump back and forth, make-believe worlds are created and secret fairy houses are built. The CDS yard is a magical place, and often, a perfectly peaceful scene of exuberant activity.

Playworks on the Yard

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2013

<div>
<p dir="ltr">I want to share some great news about a new program we are employing on the yard during recess. Rebecca Kroll, Assistant Head of School, writes below about some new techniques we're trying this year to improve the recess experience for all.</p>

Play, Passion, and Purpose

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Earlier this fall, the faculty and staff met to discuss the book we read over the summer, Teach Your Children Well: Parenting for Authentic Success by Madeline Levine. Our discussions centered on broadening our definition of success and thinking about how children develop self-efficacy. Levine makes the case for unstructured play, something CDS believes in and practices in the early childhood program and in the elementary program. According to Dr.

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